New duo-consoles good for sega or bad?

Posted on September 4th, 2011 by JMT.
Categories: Articles.

What impact does the proliferation of those new aftermarket multi-console systems have on retro sega gaming?

There’s a couple of different perspectives. One is for spreading the games. The other is for the used market.

Clearly the more people who have systems to play the games, the more people will experience the old sega games. Bundling the NES/SNES/Genesis on one console can help, because some people just remember the SNES as their favorite, and this piggy-backs the genesis onto their console, so they might then pick up some of those games and see firsthand that the genesis was in fact far superior to the SNES in terms of capabilities and games.

If it convinces people to buy more games, or they need to buy any games for a new console, that helps the secondary used market for games. As you know I vend used video games a bit. I can’t say I specifically have ever made a sale of a game I know went to someone who had one of these new duo/triple systems. I’m not really sure I know anyone who’s bought one.

I would expect that at the minimum it would hurt console system sales. Since it’s cheaper (50$) to get three consoles in one than to buy them all separate. Plus only one power supply instead of three wall bricks. Plus the pins are probably better so you don’t have to clean it all every time you play a game.

But in fact I’ve sold 2 genesis systems this summer at flea markets already, which is actually a lot as far as genesis is concerned (and consider I’m a small player, and only have like 4 in stock for the year).

I personally kind of don’t like them, just because I think people should buy the “real thing” and not a knock off. But at the same time, I think if it gets someone to play Sonic who might not have otherwise played sonic, we all win.

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